A Barbarian in the Reading room

Welcome to my blog

 

Why this title? Well in my last school job I had a reading (as in reading a book) room and this was used on Open Days by the Learning Support Department. At one such event they put up a notice saying Leaning Support and I said "Oh I suppose this is the Reading (as in UK town to the west of London) Room now." They retorted by naming me the Barbarian and it has sort of stuck.

 

Sadly, this blog does not include much about Reading (as in the UK town to the west of London) or barbarians but will contain my thoughts on issues in the library and information world and also detail some of the events I have attended, places I have visited and courses I have run. Enjoy!

Barbarian's Busy Summer

By sjpavey, Aug 2 2015 11:40PM

June kicked off with some consultancy at Caterham School getting their cataloguing system ready for the new update and this was followed by running a cataloguing course for librarians and library assistants at Fortismere School and schools local to them. It was a fun session and everyone joined in the tasks with lots of enthusiasm. In fact June was quite a bit of a cataloguing based month as I also delivered some Access-It training to Epsom College.


The LISSEE meeting this term was held at Ardingly College and had an excellent agenda with interesting talks on independent learning projects and graphic novels. I learned a lot about the different types of Manga which was all new to me. After lunch I had the opportunity to run a hand on session on the talking products and managed to select a few willing volunteers to be filmed for TTS commenting on some of the toys.


On 10th June I attended the Librarians as Teachers Conference at Aston University . Amazingly I was awake enough to deliver my session - I'd been playing for a gig for Mars Chocolate in Surrey the night before until late and then had to drive up to Warwick to stay the night. Trying to find the right car park at Aston was a challenge but I succeded just in time. The talk on visual literacyt went down well with the audience of about 80 mostly from universities. Adam Lancaster was the other schools speaker and we also had presentations from the health sector and Jane Secker gave an outline of ANCIL and Andrew Walsh gave us some more gaming ideas. It was a great day and well worth the trip.


June was also the month I decided to enrol for September in the City & Guilds Education & Training Course (formerly PTLLS ) at NESCOT. I had an interview and received an unconditional offer ...so on Monday evenings in the Autumn Term it will be back to school for me! Really looking forward to it.


June continued with some mpre consultancy work at Roedean looking at possibilities for the recdevelopment of their library. It's an exciting project with plenty of options to consider.


Next stop was down to Southampton to run the Developing Writing Skills course for Creative Education. This was a new course for me but it all went very well. The amusing part was that I had got up at the crack of dawn to get to Southampton and avoid the traffic and then it transpired so had my two delegates who worked in a school 5 miles from my house. Still we agreed it was nice to have a day at the seaside!


Then it was back to London for the Haileybury Group meeting at Highgate School. They have a lovely refurbished library and I was able to pass on some tips to Roedean. I gave a talk on Visual Literacy combined with a play on the talking gadgets which provoked a lot of interest and comment. Unfortunately I could only snatch a quick lunch as I had to rush to the ISLG meeting in the afternoon at The Institute of Education Library. It was good to hear my friend Sally Perry tell us about the library which was fascinating and I hope to use the free pass to have a more detailed look around later in the year.


June was rounded off with speaking at the Capita Conference about the New KS3 English Curriculum by kind invitation of TTS. It was an audience of about 80 teachers who seemed surprised to have a librarian speaking and who asked lots of questions both at the end of my talk and also when i was on the panel in the afternoon. What was sad, was the number who did not have a librarian or a library in school - about a third of thise present. Many were using Accelerated Reader as a substitute for having a library which rather endorses the current trend for school libraries to be seen as an adjunct of the English Department and having the sole remit of reading for pleasure. In my opinion this is not doing any favours for professional librarians and may be part of the reason why head teachers are letting qualified staff go and replacing them with unqualified part timers and even volunteers. So many librarian jobs at present have abyssmal salaries, ask for no qualifications, and are often combined with other jobs such as exams officer, receptionist and reprographics technician. The cross curricular nature of the job and the teaching of information literacy (so important now ICT has been replaced by Computing) seems to have been lost just when it is needed most by young people.



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